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Scorpions (Tityus dinizi) in a Historical Site of the State of Amazonas, Brazil

Scorpions Among Historic Ruin
  • Jonas Martins
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Jonas Gama Martins, MSc, Pós-Graduação em Genética, Conservação e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA), Manaus, AM, Brazil
    Affiliations
    Pós-Graduação em Genética, Conservação e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Manaus, AM, Brazil
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  • Rudi Procópio
    Affiliations
    Pós-Graduação em Biotecnologia e Recursos Naturais da Amazônia, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus, AM, Brazil
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Published:October 10, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2022.07.002
      The natural beauty of the Amazon attracts tourists and natural historians from all over the world.
      • Simonetti S.R.
      Tourism and intangible heritage of the village of Paricatuba: the history in the ruins.
      ,
      • Peralta N.
      Ecotourism as an incentive to biodiversity conservation: the case of Uakari Lodge, Amazonas, Brazil.
      In the region of Manaus, capital of the state of Amazonas, the tourist attractions include places such as museums, jungle hotels, zoos, walks through the forest, rivers, and beaches.
      • Peralta N.
      Ecotourism as an incentive to biodiversity conservation: the case of Uakari Lodge, Amazonas, Brazil.
      A popular site is the ruins of Village of Paricatuba (3°04'58.1"S 60°14'04.6"W), located on the banks of the Rio Negro, Municipality of Iranduba, state of Amazonas, Brazil.
      • Simonetti S.R.
      Tourism and intangible heritage of the village of Paricatuba: the history in the ruins.
      These buildings opened in the 19th century and served as an agricultural school, hospital, and public prison.
      • Simonetti S.R.
      Tourism and intangible heritage of the village of Paricatuba: the history in the ruins.
      During our scientific expedition (November 2020) to this site (Figure 1, top), we identified 15 adult specimens of Tityus dinizi Lourenço, 1997, inside these ruins. An adult male found inside the buildings was approximately 1 m above the ground (Figure 1, bottom). In Brazil, there are a total of 170 species of scorpions known,
      ,
      • Martins J.G.
      • Santos G.C.
      • Procópio R.E.
      • Arantes E.C.
      • Bordon K.C.F.
      Scorpion species of medical importance in the Brazilian Amazon: a review to identify knowledge gaps.
      and approximately 28% of this fauna occurs in the state of Amazonas.
      • Martins J.G.
      • Santos G.C.
      • Procópio R.E.
      • Arantes E.C.
      • Bordon K.C.F.
      Scorpion species of medical importance in the Brazilian Amazon: a review to identify knowledge gaps.
      Figure 1
      Figure 1Historic site of Paricatuba in the state of Amazonas, Brazil (top); Tityus dinizi on an inner wall of the building (bottom).
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        Tourism and intangible heritage of the village of Paricatuba: the history in the ruins.
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        Ecotourism as an incentive to biodiversity conservation: the case of Uakari Lodge, Amazonas, Brazil.
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