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Erratum

        In Luks AM, McIntosh SE, Grissom CK, Auerbach PS, Rodway GW, Schoene RB, Zafren K, Hackett PH, Wilderness Medical Society Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness, WEM 21:147-155, an important aspect of classifying risk was omitted in Table 3 on page 149. We sincerely regret the error and submit the corrected Table 3.
        Table 3Risk Categories for Acute Mountain Sickness
        Risk CategoryDescription
        Low
        • Individuals with no prior history of altitude illness and ascending to ≤ 2800 m;
        • Individuals taking ≥ 2 days to arrive at 2500-3000 m with subsequent increases in sleeping elevation < 500 m/day and an extra day for acclimatization every 1000 m
        Moderate
        • Individuals with prior history of AMS and ascending to 2500-2800 m in 1 day
        • No history of AMS and ascending to > 2800 m in 1 day
        • All individuals ascending > 500 m/day (increase in sleeping elevation) at altitudes above 3000 m but with an extra day for acclimatization every 1000 m
        High
        • History of AMS and ascending to ≥ 2800 m in 1 day
        • All individuals with a prior history of HAPE or HACE
        • All individuals ascending to > 3500 m in 1 day
        • All individuals ascending > 500 m/day (increase in sleeping elevation) above > 3000 m without extra days for acclimatization
        • Very rapid ascents (eg. < 7 day ascents of Mt. Kilimanjaro)
        AMS, Acute mountain sickness; HACE, High altitude cerebral edema; HAPE, High altitude pulmonary edema
        Notes:
        • Altitudes listed in the table refer to the altitude at which the person sleeps
        • Ascent is assumed to start from elevations < 1200 m
        • The risk categories described above pertain to unacclimatized individuals

        Linked Article

        • Wilderness Medical Society Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness
          Wilderness & Environmental MedicineVol. 21Issue 2
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            To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations for their roles in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians.
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