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Errata

        In a collective review by E. Ben Welch and Barry J. Gales, “Use of stun guns for venomous bites and stings: a review,” published in Issue 2, Volume 12, page 111, reference 29, the reference to Dr David L. Hardy, Sr, MD, was misprinted as “Harding.” The reference citation, however, is correct. The authors and editors regret the error.
        In a Letter to the Editor by Subhash C. Arya, “Disasters and therapeutic or prophylactic interventions,” published in Issue 2, Volume 12, page 154, the references were omitted. The editors regret the omission. The references are as follows:

        References

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          • Ashkenazi I.
          Infection control in earthquake rescue team.
          Lancet. 1999; 354: 1564
          • Horton R.
          Croatia and Bosnia: the imprints of war—II. Restoration.
          Lancet. 1999; 353: 2223-2228
          • Horton R.
          Physicians’ Desk Reference.
          53rd ed. Medical Economics Company, Montvale1999
        1. Brown F New Approaches to Stabilization of Vaccine Potency. Karger, Basel1996

        Linked Article

        • Use of stun guns for venomous bites and stings: a review
          Wilderness & Environmental MedicineVol. 12Issue 2
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            During the past 2 decades, articles suggesting that stun guns be utilized to treat venomous bites and stings have appeared in both the lay and medical press. Although never widely considered to be standard therapy for venomous bites and stings, stun guns are still considered to be a treatment option by some medical practitioners and outdoor enthusiasts. A Medline search was performed using these terms: venomous bites, venomous stings, snake bites, spider bites, electrical, stun gun, high voltage electricity, low amperage electricity, direct current, and shock therapy.
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        • Disasters and therapeutic or prophylactic interventions
          Wilderness & Environmental MedicineVol. 12Issue 2
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            War, political uprising, famine, civil war, and natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, or cyclones involve considerable disability, mortality, and economic loss for the masses. Apart from emergency operations involving search and rescue for survivors, health care personnel are obliged to tackle infections, psychological disorders, and other emergency situations besides those afflicted by disasters. Survivors need an uninterrupted supply of medications for different medical disorders. Prophylactic substance usage is an integral component of the strategies directed to prevent disease outbreaks among large congregations of survivors.
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